The completion of Lumuamua school

“Now we’re sure, when Nema make a promise, they will deliver us great things”:  Lumuamua school director yesterday when we handed over the school to him.  

As the kids danced inside their new classrooms we laughed with them at another great successful project.  A building we hope brings greater things to the village of lumuamua. 

In just 5 months we have built 3 classrooms, to government standards, a latrine block and a water catchment system. This is not just a school, it’s an attempt to improve all things in life for these kids; a better place to study, improved hygeine standards and cleaner drinking water. 

With a combination of our school lunch programme and the new building, and a good school director who keeps the students in school every day, this school will achieve near 100% attendance every day.

In the many times I’ve visited here in the last 3 months I’ve never witnessed a day of missed school from the director or the 2 teachers, one of which is female.  It’s a well run school where the motivation and drive are top down and I see energised and enthusiastic students. 

When I asked the students if they liked their new school they all jumped up and down with a resounding “sim”.  I asked them if they were going to help the clean-up, again a resounding “sim”.  Then they ran to the school jumping up and down in the classrooms and singing. It’s great to see the village and school spirit here.

One of our main contacts has been a member of the school executive committee, he has also been the warehouse keeper and great supporter, and he was very keen for us to bring him some paint so he could paint “the Nema school of Lumuamua” on the wall.  He just couldn’t stop smiling. 

Abacar now takes his 2 weeks of holiday that he has left, and we’re waiting to see what our next big project is. 

I was in Manica yesterday for a great meeting with the school committee, village chief and another really good young school director.  They are desperate for their school shack to be converted into a brick building.  It’s the beginning of the rainy season and we’re not going to risk building projects that big during the rains:  there’s the risk of collapsing the building and it’s really dangerous to drive a heavily laden car on the wet muddy roads. 

That gives us time to find the funds and make a good plan to get the community fully engaged in the project:  they are making a good start with lots of proactive questions showing a desire to get their school built.

We must say a big “nishikuru” to all our donors and supporters, this school was built in partnership with a grant from the Waterloo Foundation and our partner charity Maninga:  muito obrigada.